Life Line Activity

Welcome!

This is an introductory session of a series of Arts-Informed Narrative Inquiry activities, which were created to assist you in engaging in creative reflection on Person-Centred Care (PCC) within any professional context.

As you move through this session, activities are marked as: Circle, Pairs, or Individual. These are suggested options for, what we believe to be, a richer experience through reflective dialogue with others. However, these can be adapted to the situation, the purpose of engaging in these activities, as well as on the number of persons doing the activities at one time.

For example, when one person is doing the activities on her/his/their own, instead of a group [Circle] discussion, the individual may want to use her/his/their reflective journal to ‘dialogue on paper’.

Starting with Ourselves: Stories of person-centred care experiences

Welcome!

This is Session 1 of a series of Arts-Informed Narrative Inquiry activities, which were created to assist you in engaging in creative reflection on Person-Centred Care (PCC) within any professional context.

As you move through this session, activities are marked as: Circle, Pairs, or Individual. These are suggested options for, what we believe to be, a richer experience through reflective dialogue with others. However, these can be adapted to the situation, the purpose of engaging in these activities, as well as on the number of persons doing the activities at one time.

For example, when one person is doing the activities on her/his/their own, instead of a group [Circle] discussion, the individual may want to use her/his/their reflective journal to ‘dialogue on paper’.

Creative Activity:

This activity is part of a larger creative self-expression exercise called the Narrative Reflective Process (Schwind, 2008, 2016).

This session focuses on individual and small group work exploring the experience of Person-Centred Care (PCC) in any professional context.

  1. Individual: Consider how you envision PCC … write your definition of PCC.
  2. Individual: Immerse yourself in that definition and identify an instance where you provided PCC. Write a story about a situation that shows what happened.
  3. Individual: Think of a time when you received/were the beneficiary of PCC? Write a story about a situation that shows what happened.
  4. Individual: Read your two stories to identify commonalities and differences.
  5. Pairs: Share the two stories with another person; Identify common elements of PCC between the two persons (i.e. the 4 stories). Where are they the same and where are they different? — Level of disclosure to your comfort level—
  6. Circle: Each pair shares a summary of their discussion about PCC.
  7. Circle:
  • What was the experience like of writing the two stories?
  • What difference does it make, if any, to define PCC from your lived experience versus from your initial thoughts that may be based in literature or other received knowledge?
  • Do youengage inperson-centred care in your professional role? If so, what does it look like? If not, how would that look like for you?

For session 2 you will be asked to engage in a creative activity, called Metaphoric Reflection.

Keep journaling!


 

References

Schwind, J. K. (2008). Accessing humanness: From experience to research, from classroom to praxis. In J. K. Schwind & G. M. Lindsay (Eds.), From experience to relationships: Reconstructing ourselves in education and healthcare. (pp. 77-94). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing Inc.

Schwind, J. K. (2016). Narrative Reflective Process: A creative experiential path to personal-knowing in teaching-learning scholarship. In J. Gingras, P. Robinson, J. Waddell, L. & Cooper (Eds.), Teaching as scholarship: Preparing students for professional practice in community services. (pp. 137-154). Waterloo, ON: Wilfrid Laurier University Press.

Metaphoric Reflection: Image, letters and poems of person-centred care

Welcome!

This is Session 2 of a series of Arts-Informed Narrative Inquiry activities, which were created to assist you in engaging in creative reflection on Person-Centred Care (PCC) within any professional context.

As you move through this session, activities are marked as: Circle, Pairs, or Individual. These are suggested options for, what we believe to be, a richer experience through reflective dialogue with others. However, these can be adapted to the situation, the purpose of engaging in these activities, as well as on the number of persons doing the activities at one time.

For example, when one person is doing the activities on her/his/their own, instead of a group [Circle] discussion, the individual may want to use her/his/their reflective journal to ‘dialogue on paper’.

Creative Activity:

During this session you will engage in Metaphoric Reflection. This activity is part of a larger creative self-expression exercise called the Narrative Reflective Process (Schwind, 2008, 2016).

Metaphor is a symbolic image that best represents for you a particular experience, situation or a trait. It is something that you can represent visually, and whose characteristics you can describe.

For example, when I asked my senior undergraduate students to choose a metaphor that best represents them as “instruments-of-care”, some chose such metaphors as: a willow tree, an owl, an open hand, knitting needles, and so on. There are no right or wrong answers! Whatever you choose, is right for you. You are the one who interprets your chosen image. The most important thing is that it has meaning for you.

For this session, you will need your journal, drawing paper and crayons or markers … even a pen or a pencil would do … and a piece or two of writing paper, such as stationary.

You can choose any additional artistic materials that would help you express yourself creatively.

This process serves to increase your self-awareness and self-knowledge, and how these may impact your personal and professional being, knowing and doing.

Remember, there are no right or wrong answers.

There are five Phases in this exercise. Some phases may contain several steps within them. Once you complete the activity, continue on to the next step.

This is a progressive and cumulative exercise, where one step or phase builds on the previous one.
Shall we begin!

Phase 1: Individual

Step 1: Review your stories and definitions from the previous session. First, choose one metaphor (a symbolic image) that best represents the time(s) when you received Person-Centred Care. Draw the image into your journal. Don’t worry about your artistic skills; what is important is that you creatively express your metaphor on paper. This is your work for you!

Step 2: Once you have drawn your image, consider: What are the characteristics of my metaphor? How would I describe this metaphor to someone else? Write your responses in your journal.

Step 3: Next, choose another metaphor (a symbolic image) that best represents the time(s) when you provided Person-Centred Care. Draw the image into your journal

Step 4: Once you have drawn your image, consider: What are the characteristics of my metaphor? How would I describe this metaphor to someone else? Write your responses in your journal.

 

Phase 2: Individual

  •  In your journal reflect on:
    – How are the two metaphoric images similar and how are they different?
    – How am I like, or not like, each of my metaphors?

 

Phase 3: Individual

  • Now choose a piece of stationary or a blank sheet of writing paper and have your metaphor (the one where you were providing PCC) write you a letter … This may sound strange at first, but consider: If your metaphor could talk, what would it say? What would be its message to you?

 

Phase 4: Individual

  • Reflect in your journal on how awareness of yourself through this metaphor activity informs who you are as a nurse and how you are in therapeutic relationships with persons in your care

 

Phase 5: Individual

  • Using words from your stories in Session 1 and in your activities today, create a poetic representation of what PCC means to you (choose words, phrases, sentences from your writing to construct your poem)

 

Keep journaling!


 

References

Schwind, J. K. (2009). Metaphor-reflection in my healthcare experience. Aporia.(www.aporiajournal.com), 1(1), 15-21.

Schwind, J. K. (2016). Narrative Reflective Process: A creative experiential path to personal-knowing in teaching-learning scholarship. In J. Gingras, P. Robinson, J. Waddell, L. & Cooper (Eds.), Teaching as scholarship: Preparing students for professional practice in community services. (pp. 137-154). Waterloo, ON: Wilfrid Laurier University Press.

 

 

 

Person-centred care in social context: Collage-making to illuminate self in relationship to environment

Welcome!

This is Session 3 of a series of Arts-Informed Narrative Inquiry activities, which were created to assist you in engaging in creative reflection on Person-Centred Care (PCC) within any professional context.

As you move through this session, activities are marked as: Circle, Pairs, or Individual. These are suggested options for, what we believe to be, a richer experience through reflective dialogue with others. However, these can be adapted to the situation, the purpose of engaging in these activities, as well as on the number of persons doing the activities at one time.

For example, when one person is doing the activities on her/his/their own, instead of a group [Circle] discussion, the individual may want to use her/his/their reflective journal to ‘dialogue on paper’.

Creative Activity:

You will need one large (70 X 55 cm or 28 X 22 inches) poster paper, old magazines, personally meaningful objects, any other art supplies, such as coloured pens or pencils, glitter glue, ribbon, etc.

  1. Individual: To begin this activity, think back to the Metaphoric Reflection you completed on your own. Consider the following questions and write answers in your journal:
  • What was your experience of the Metaphoric Reflection activity?
  • What was the central message from your metaphor to yourself (review your image, letter and poem)?
  • How does awareness of yourself through metaphoric images, letters, and poems inform who you are as a practitioner/professional and how you are in professional and/or therapeutic relationships with persons in your care?
  • Have you considered your metaphor in your practice? If so, how did you use it? And if not, how could you use metaphors (metaphoric images or symbolic images) to augment your professional practice?
  1. Individual: Gather your art supplies and take a few minutes to reflect on the work of first two sessions – definition and stories of being cared for/caring for, metaphor, letter, poem … also look at the personally significant objects you gathered. How are they meaningful to you?
  2. Individual: Create a collage (chosen items arranged on the large poster paper) that demonstrates a person-centred care environment in your professional context. Place yourself in that environment (with images, words, personal artefacts, etc). Take all the time you need until the collage feels complete for you.
  3. Individual/Pairs/Circle: Take a break and return to your collage with your journal or with another person, or in a group, to share your collage; consider the following reflective dialogue prompts —
  • What environment did you place yourself in?
  • What does it mean for you to be person-centred?
  • How does the environment affect your ability to practice person-centred care/to be person-centred?
  • Identify the factors in the environment that facilitate person-centred care/practice.
  • Identify the factors in the environment that are a barrier to person-centred care
  • How would the environment need to be changed in order for you to practice person-centred care?
  • How does this relate to your current environment?
  1. Circle: What have you learned about yourself, PCC, and your practice?

Keep journaling!

 

 

 

 

Embodiment of Person-Centred Care: Movement and sensory awareness

Welcome!

This is Session 4 of a series of Arts-Informed Narrative Inquiry activities, which were created to assist you in engaging in creative reflection on Person-Centred Care (PCC) within any professional context.

As you move through this session, activities are marked as: Circle, Pairs, or Individual. These are suggested options for, what we believe to be, a richer experience through reflective dialogue with others. However, these can be adapted to the situation, the purpose of engaging in these activities, as well as on the number of persons doing the activities at one time.

For example, when one person is doing the activities on her/his/their own, instead of a group [Circle] discussion, the individual may want to use her/his/their reflective journal to ‘dialogue on paper’.

 

Creative Activity:

The purpose of this session is to bring mindfulness through movement, a walking meditation, to everyday life.

Epstein reminds us, “(w)hen we think of our bodies as “things” that are separate from us and our minds as “places” where we think, we foster our own sense of alienation or remove. Mindfulness practice begins, for this reason, with the awareness of the breath and the body … it is quite literally a coming to one’s senses” (1995, p. 144).

For this exercise, you will need to prepare a quiet place. Gather your journal, mandala pages (click the link to download), coloured pencils and a pen. Mandalas are circles, used in many cultures, to focus attention on wholeness, and the unity of life (see Appendix 1: Mandalas Explained).

This exercise can be divided into four phases. You can complete them at your convenience, but we recommend that you do them sequentially. The phases are 1) writing, 2) walking, 3) colouring, and 4) returning to reflective writing.

Choose a time where you can be uninterrupted for at least 90 minutes. The activity is meant to be undertaken by you in quiet solitude. The walking can be done inside or outside. The important thing is to have some time to write and space to wander/walk.

Phase 1: Individual
Begin by writing in your journal – write down anything that may be on your mind and any questions you may have about your work that could be related to person-centred care/practice. When you feel ready, put your journal aside; you will come back to it later.

Phase 2: Individual
Allow 10-15 minutes (more if you wish) for this phase of the exercise.
Dressing comfortably for the weather and for walking, begin by standing with your feet solidly on the ground. Look around at your surroundings. Take in your environment through your senses: what are you seeing, smelling, and hearing? Hold your arms naturally and start to walk, feeling your feet touch the ground. Walk more slowly than you normally would.

Try to move your energy down from thinking in your head to feeling in your body: feel your toes and heels in contact with the ground. Pay attention to the sensations of moving through space. Be attentive to the present moment. As thoughts of the past or future come into your mind, let them go like waves on a beach: there they are and there they go. Bring your awareness back to the sensations of being in your body walking.

There is no destination, no errands, just walking. Walking with mindfulness is a kind of concentration, attentiveness to feeling each step. When your mind wanders, gently bring your attention back to your feet touching the ground. Walk in silence. “Walk with your whole body and mind. Don’t think” (Hanh, 2013, p. 95). It is normal for our minds to wander, each time you notice it, you can bring your attention back to the movement of walking.

You will walk more slowly than normal and may find your steps and breathing attune to one another. There is no other place you have to be, there is nothing else you have to do.

Phase 3: Individual

  • After the walk, return to your quiet place and the art materials.
  • When you feel ready, choose one of the mandalas (or draw your own) and colour it as you feel moved to do so.
  • Observe what is rising up in you as your eyes take in the shapes and your hand colours them.
  • Be aware of your thoughts and feelings; then let them go.
  • When you feel finished with your mandala, sit quietly and consider what you have created.

Phase 4: Individual/Circle
Write in your journal about the experience of walking while being present, as well as the experience of colouring your mandala. Revisit any questions you wrote down before walking.
Think about:

  • How did it feel to walk slowly and in awareness?
  • How did it feel to allow thoughts to come and go as you walked mindfully?
  • How were you aware of your environment? Did you notice anything you were not aware of before?
  • How is this activity helping you to think further about Person-Centred Care?
  • Could you share any part of this activity with your colleagues or with people in your care?

Keep journaling!

Deepening inquiry: Music and drawing-in-relationships

Welcome!

This is Session 5 of a series of Arts-Informed Narrative Inquiry activities, which were created to assist you in engaging in creative reflection on Person-Centred Care (PCC) within any professional context.

As you move through this session, activities are marked as: Circle, Pairs, or Individual. These are suggested options for, what we believe to be, a richer experience through reflective dialogue with others. However, these can be adapted to the situation, the purpose of engaging in these activities, as well as on the number of persons doing the activities at one time.

For example, when one person is doing the activities on her/his/their own, instead of a group [Circle] discussion, the individual may want to use her/his/their reflective journal to ‘dialogue on paper’.

Creative Activity:

This activity, adapted from the work done by K. Mantas (2007), requires a small group of people to participate. Each person needs a large piece of art paper, a journal, coloured pencils, writing paper and an envelope.
Below, find the music: On Wings of Song (Johnston & Shippey).

 

  1. Individual: Think back on previous sessions:
  • How was the experience of the walking meditation? What stood out for you in that experience?
  • Review your mandalas—what did these add to your learning/experience?
  • Think back to your chosen metaphors and the learning from that activity.
  • What came to your awareness about person-centred care/practice in all the creative activities you engaged in to date? 

2.  Circle: Sit in a circle with the art paper and coloured pencils in front of each person.

  • Begin to play the music
  • Think of a question you still want answered in order to better understand PCC; write your question on the back of the art paper without sharing it with anyone else
  • Turn the art paper over and listen to the music; pause to be present with your question; intuitively choose colouring pencils and let your hand move across the paper as you continue to listen to the music. You do not need to draw anything in particular – just let the music guide your hand as you listen. Any thoughts that come into your mind, simply let them go.

3. Circle: After one to two minutes, move one position to the right, so that you are in front of your neighbour’s art paper; just continue listening to the music and colouring. Repeat this changing of places to the right until you return to your original position.

4. Individual: Continue to listen to the music and look closely at the colours/images on your art paper

  • Consider what these images are telling you.
  • Re-read your question and contemplate what is being revealed in relation to it.
  • In your journal reflect on:
  • How was my question answered?
  • What did I learn from/through this exercise about my question?

5. Individual: Write a letter to yourself about how you see person-centred care/practice and what it means to you now that you have participated in these arts-informed narrative inquiry sessions. [look back over your journal and original definition of PCC]

6. Circle: Share your writing to the level of your comfort with the group.

7. Individual: Address the envelope with your home address, put the letter in the envelope and mail it to yourself. When you receive the letter in the mail, note how you respond to what you had written.


References

Mantas, K. (2007). Meeting mermaids: Co-creating images and process in inquiry. In G. Knowles, T. C. Luciani, A. L. Cole & L. Neilsen (Eds.), The art of visual inquiry (Vol. 3, pp. 153 – 166). Halifax, NS: Backalong Books and Toronto, Ontario: Centre for Arts-Informed Research.